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Kinesiology and Community Health :: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The Department of Kinesiology and Community Health
College of Applied Health Sciences

Yih-Kuen Jan, Ph.D.

Yih-Kuen Jan

Associate Professor

Department of Kinesiology and Community Health
College of Applied Health Sciences
Email: yjan@illinois.edu
Phone:(217) 300-7253
Fax:(217) 333-2766

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Download Curriculum Vitae (PDF)
Research: Rehabilitation Engineering Lab


Degree

Ph.D., Rehabilitation Science, University of Pittsburgh, 2004

Research and Professional Interests

Prof. Jan is Director of Rehabilitation Engineering Lab in the Division of Disability Resources and Educational Services. He is committed to developing rehabilitation technologies for the prevention and management of secondary conditions in people with impaired mobility. He is recognized for research in microvascular dynamics and soft tissue biomechanics and their roles in the development of pressure ulcers, one of the most significant secondary conditions in wheelchair users. Prof. Jan has extensively published his research work to improve the understanding of the effect of various pathophysiological conditions (spinal cord injury, aging, diabetes, physical inactivity) on microvascular dysfunction and how this impairment contributes to the development of pressure ulcers. His pioneering work on using linear wavelet and nonlinear complexity analyses to characterize blood flow oscillations has been awarded research grants from the NIH, NIDRR, PVA Foundation and Reeve Foundation. Based on Prof. Jan’s findings, patterns of blood flow oscillations have a great potential to assess the risk of pressure ulcers and evaluate the efficacy of various preventive interventions in people with impaired mobility, including people with spinal cord injury, people with lower limb amputation, diabetics and elderly wheelchair users. Prof. Jan’s contributions to science are summarized below.

  1. Wheelchair Tilt and Recline for Preventing Pressure Ulcers
    1. Jan YK, Jones MA, Rabadi MH, Foreman RD, Thiessen A (2010). Effect of wheelchair tilt-in-space and recline angles on skin perfusion over the ischial tuberosity in people with spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 91(11), 1758-1764.
    2. Jan YK, Liao F, Jones MA, Rice LA, Tisdell T (2013). Effect of durations of wheelchair tilt-in-space and recline on skin perfusion over the ischial tuberosity in people with spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 94(4), 667-672.
    3. Jan YK, Crane BA (2013). Wheelchair tilt-in-space and recline does not reduce sacral skin perfusion as changing from the upright to the reclined and tilted position in people with spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 94(6), 1207-1210.
    4. Jan YK, Crane BA, Liao F, Woods JA, Ennis WJ (2013). Comparison of muscle and skin perfusion at the ischial tuberosities in response to wheelchair tilt-in-space and recline angles in people with spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 94(10), 1990-1996.
  2. Wheelchair Cushion Technology for Preventing Pressure Ulcers
    1. Jan YK, Brienza DM, Boninger ML, Brenes G (2011). Comparison of skin perfusion response with alternating and constant pressures in people with spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord, 49(1), 136-141.
    2. Jan YK, Lee B, Liao F, Foreman RD (2012). Local cooling reduces skin ischemia under surface pressure in rats: an assessment by wavelet analysis of laser Doppler blood flow oscillations. Physiological Measurement, 33(10), 1733-1745.
    3. Jan YK, Liao F, Rice LA, Woods JA (2013). Using reactive hyperemia to assess the efficacy of local cooling on reducing skin ischemia under surface pressure in people with spinal cord injury: a preliminary report. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 94(10), 1982-1989.
    4. Lee B, Benyajati S, Woods JA, Jan YK (2014). Effect of local cooling on pro-inflammatory cytokines and blood flow of the skin under surface pressure in rats: feasibility study. Journal of Tissue Viability, 23(2), 69-77.
  3. Microvascular Dysfunction and Pressure Ulcer Risks
    1. Geyer MJ, Jan YK, Brienza DM, Boninger ML (2004). Using wavelet analysis to characterize the thermoregulatory mechanisms of sacral skin blood flow. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 41(6), 797-806.
    2. Jan YK, Struck BD, Foreman RD, Robinson C (2009). Wavelet analysis of skin blood flow oscillations to assess soft tissue viability in older adults. Microvascular Research, 78(2), 162-168.
    3. Jan YK, Anderson M, Soltani J, Burns S, Foreman RD (2013). Comparison of changes in heart rate variability and sacral skin perfusion in response to postural changes in people with spinal cord injury. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 50(2), 203-214.
    4. Liao F, Burns S, Jan YK (2013). Skin blood flow dynamics and its role in pressure ulcers. Journal of Tissue Viability, 22(2), 25-36.
  4. Soft Tissue Biomechanics of Diabetic Foot Ulcers
    1. Burns S, Jan YK (2012). Chapter 1: Diabetic foot ulceration and amputation. In: Kim CT, ed. Rehabilitation Medicine. InTech Publisher, Croatia, pp 1-20.
    2. Jan YK, Lung CW, Cuaderes E, Rong D, Boyce K (2013). Effect of viscoelastic properties of plantar soft tissues on plantar pressures at the first metatarsal head in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy. Physiological Measurement, 34(1), 53-66.
    3. Lung CW, Liau BY, Jan YK (2013). Plantar pressure gradient angles to evaluate risk of diabetic foot ulcers. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 8025, 240-247.
    4. Jan YK, Shen S, Foreman RD, Ennis WJ (2013). Skin blood flow response to locally applied mechanical and thermal stresses in the diabetic foot. Microvascular Research, 89, 40-46.
  5. Wheeled Mobility Technology Development
    1. Jan YK, Brienza DM (2006). Technology for pressure ulcer prevention. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, 11(4), 30-41.
    2. Liau BY, Lung CW, Jan YK (2013). Development of human balance assessment system with continuous center of gravity tracking. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 8025, 332-337.
    3. Yang TD, Hutchinson S, Rice LA, Watkin K, and Jan YK (2013). Development of a scalable monitoring system for wheelchair tilt-in-space usage. International Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 1(4), 129 (6 pages).
    4. Fu J, Liu T, Jones M, Qin G, and Jan YK (2014). Characterization of wheelchair maneuvers based on noisy inertial sensor data: A preliminary study. Proceeding of IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2014, 1731-1734.

See curriculum vitae for information about awards, honors, publications, and professional associations. (Download Curriculum Vitae)



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